After a series of secretive meetings, Republican lawmakers in the Senate have finally revealed their plan to repeal and replace huge parts of the Affordable Care Act.

That leaves little time for senators to gather input from the people they work for.

Democrats are expected to unanimously vote against the bill.

Other Republicans appeared more willing to embrace it. Senator Bill Cassidy, who is still studying the proposal and has not yet decided how he will vote, said in several television interviews it was a good beginning.

Last month, a version of Trumpcare that would strip health care from 23 million people passed the House.

However, the hard break that Heller made with the Senate bill on means any negotiations McConnell and his allies are likely to have with the conservative wing of the party will be fraught at best.

"Transitioning federal Medicaid payments to a per-capita, or block grant system, and freezing Medicaid expansion would reduce the number of people with insurance and increase hospitals' exposure to bad debt and uncompensated care costs", said Ms. Gladstone. "That's the broad outline of this plan". Numerous companies help manage state Medicaid programs, meaning their profits can be hurt by those cuts as well.

Top Senate Democrat Chuck Schumer called the new Bill "heartless", warning it would eventually cut Medicaid even more steeply than the House legislation, which slashes it by US$800 billion (S$1.1 trillion) over a decade.

States with a large population receiving Medicare, health insurance for seniors, or Medicaid, government-subsidised insurance for low-income or disabled people, may be negatively affected by the bill in its current draft.

But it repeals the individual mandate requiring people to buy health insurance without creating incentives for Americans to stay in their plans. Any reasonable Senate Republican, including Sen. Tim Scott told reporters on Thursday.

Sens. Paul Ryan of Kentucky, Ted Cruz of Texas, Mike Lee of Utah and Ron Johnson of Wisconsin all said they would not support the current bill after its long-awaited reveal. But it would be more gradual than the House bill, which cuts off the extra funds for new Medicaid beneficiaries in 2020.

The day before, Senate Republicans unveiled a draft bill to roll back Obamacare, including a drastic reduction in federal healthcare spending that threatens to leave millions more Americans uninsured, drive up costs for poor consumers and further destabilize the nation's health insurance markets.

Also, Dean Heller of Nevada, Rob Portman of OH and Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia said they're concerned about the bill's cuts to Medicaid and drug addiction efforts.


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